C3 Corp. Touts Tweaked Foam-compression Machinery

C3 Corp., a machinery and engineering services supplier based in Appleton, Wisconsin, has made some updates to the BC2396 bun compression and roll-packing machine that launched in May.

The company modified the equipment’s roll cage and refined the application of the final layer of plastic film that packages the finished roll.

c3 corp bc2396
C3 Corp., with headquarters in Appleton, Wisconsin, removed the twists and turns in foam-bun roll-packing equipment with the BC2396 bun compression machine.

The BC2396 uses 50 tons of pressure to compress and vacuum-pack foam buns and can handle two smaller buns at once. The machine rolls the evenly tamped-down buns to a held diameter, reducing the likelihood of foam damage or distortion. It turns out finished rolls at a rate of one per minute. The machine also has a straight pass-through design—instead of a side exit. Buns go in on one end and exit out the opposite side.

Companies can fit six to 10 times more foam by volume in a single truck when buns are compressed and rolled with the BC2396, according to C3.

The machine is designed with operator ergonomics in mind and is built for durability with strong plated steel, the company said.

It handles foam buns with a maximum height, width and length of 54 inches by 84 inches by 110 inches.

“Foamers and foam fabricators both benefit greatly from flat-packing and rolling buns of foam; these consume a lot of floor space and shipping them is costly,” said Mark Desjardin, who handles business development for C3. “Our press is very smart, pressing to a force or set height, or whatever comes first. We’ll also control the speed of the press allowing the air to escape. By reducing the speed, this reduces the risk of breaking the cell structure.” 

The flexible machine allows operators to adjust the compression force, speed and compressed product height, thus reducing the likelihood of damaging foam cell structure, Desjardin said.

Another key advantage of the BC2396 is its streamlined, linear design, which enables companies to position it at the loading dock without occupying “too much of that prime real estate,” he added.